Youth Councils of Note – UNITY, Inc.

2021 Eddie Wadda Alumni of the Year Award Apply now

2020 Awardee Mel Perves

Do you know a UNITY alumnus who should be recognized for their outstanding achievement and contributions to the Native American community? UNITY is accepting nominations for its prestigious Eddie Wadda Alumni of the Year award. Application deadline is on June 18, 2021.

APPLY HERE Read More

Racial Healing Service Project Ideas

Power of Youth Challenge: America’s Promise Awards 10 Winners with $1,000 to Expand their Service Projects and Bring Positive Impacts to their Communities

Last year, America’s Promise Alliance launched the Power of Youth Challenge to encourage and inspire youth-led service projects around the country.  In partnership with Charles Stewart Mott Foundation and Peace First, we posed a challenge to young people to identify an issue or an injustice in their community and put forth an idea that engages others to make an impact. To deepen their knowledge and insights about a problem their community faces and put forth a solution, we gave them $250 to help make it happen.    Read More

UNITY Regional Midyear Meet-Ups for Native Youth

Join the National UNITY Council Executive Committee and Peer Guides as they host Regional UNITY Meet Ups. During the virtual meet-ups, youth councils are invited to gather to grow relationships and work towards goals. These Regional Meet-Ups are a fun networking opportunity and a brainstorming session for how to address community challenges.

Not only will this be an opportunity for your leaders to connect with Native youth in your region, but UNITY would also like your tribe’s feedback in the National Youth Experience Survey (NAYES) launching this month! With your youths’ help, UNITY youth will determine the key regional needs for 2021 and develop strategies to create safe, healthy, and thriving communities.

Please SELECT a REGION based on what state you live in below and join us! Read More

Snow Snake Games

‘Ojibweg (snake) Bibooni (Snow) Ataadiiwin (Game)’ is the Ojibwe language of the Anishinaabe. The Annual Snow Snake games were hosted by Ojibwe Charter School in the Bay Mills Indian Community. It was a freezing snowy winter day. Nonah and her brother Tyler participated. They are UNITY Alumni Josh and Sarah Homminga’s children. Nonah, beat her brother Tyler’s length in this friendly, but competitive match.
Read More

Native Health’s Virtual Youth Resiliency Programs


Join Resilient Indigenous Youth Council Meeting:
Native Youth, ages 11-24 years old are welcomed to participate in the Youth Council.
NATIVE HEALTH’s Resilient Indigenous Youth Council is a means of empowering Native American youth to have a meaningful role in solving community problems. This Council is also an opportunity for youth to develop their leadership potential as well as foster self-confidence and nurture cultural identity. Read More

My healing journey: UNITY Alaskan Native youth

Healing Indigenous Lives Youth Submission: Korbin Storms, Native Village of Unalakleet, Alaska

I would tell Native Youth that struggle to see themselves as leaders that they have resiliency in their DNA, that sometimes it takes someone who has been low and lost before to connect to others that are feeling that way, that they have a unique perspective and so much potential to enact change and that the best leaders are those that give hope to others. The challenge I am most proud of overcoming in my lifetime is learning that although I have a relationship with mental illness it is not define who I am. I am so much more than my depression. That, perhaps most importantly, I could be a good mother despite my illness.

If you are putting yourself into a leadership role that focuses on healing oneself, you must show character and be transparent.  #NativeYouthVoices

Read More

When I learned to love the desert, I learned to love myself

UNITY Healing Indigenous Lives Youth Submission: Damien Carlos
My whole life until I was fifteen, I didn’t know much of anything about my culture besides the fact that I belonged to the Tohono O’odham tribe. I knew nothing about where I came from. I went to schools on and off the reservation. My family dealt with alcoholism. I was in a dark place for a long time. When I was fifteen I moved back to the reservation and found people that were willing to take me places to learn about my culture. I learned songs, stories, and helped in ceremonies. I haven’t looked back since. When I learned to love the Tohono (Desert), I learned to love myself. For the last two years, I’ve been working with other youth from my community that have stories similar to mine to create a program to create opportunities for more youth to experience and learn out culture. I believe my culture saved my life and can help many more kids. Read More

Power of Empathy in Native Youth Leadership

Healing Indigenous Lives Youth Submission: Kyleigh Shipman 

In my early childhood, I witnessed close relatives struggling with substance abuse. After speaking with them, I have come to the understanding that these are battles in which a person begins to lose control. This has had a major impact on my life, and I had to learn how to handle situations that include substance abuse and alcoholism at a very young age. I learned that letting a person know that people are supporting them and assisting them in whatever they need. Learning empathy for others has shaped my leadership. These struggles with incarceration and generational addictions have made me stronger and a better helper for my people.
Read More

Thomas Henry’s vision for Saginaw Chippewa

Youth Leader Submission: Boozhoo Ginewanakwad ndiznikaaz miishiks ndoodem, Mount Pleasat nidojiba. Hello my spirit name is Golden Eagle Cloud, I am of the Turtle Clan and live in Mount Pleasant. My English name is Thomas Rae Henry, attending Mount Pleasant High School. As a member of the Saginaw Chippewa Indian Tribe of Michigan, I enjoy running, playing guitar, skateboarding, and dancing at powwows. My interests are in fashion, native culture, traditional foods and medicines, our native language, politics, and economics. I run cross country and track and am the oldest sibling in my family. I take pride in having two sisters and a little brother who look up to me. I set a good example for the native youth in my community living a drug and alcohol free life. Read More

Finding Leadership through Recycling

Meet Evelyn Vega-Simpson: Through serving as the Media Coordinator for the Tulalip Youth Council, 16 year old Evelyn has developed excellent public speaking skills while being comfortable in front of a crowd. “I have developed problem solving skills, and have good communication skills” she explained. Evelyn found her true calling for leadership through her community service work preserving the environment. As the Chair of the Environment Committee, Evelyn would like to change the way Tulalip Tribes recycle. Another goal for her is to work with her Tribal Board of Directors to install more solar panels. Read More